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Author Topic: mosin nagant 91/30 sight adjustment questions.  (Read 3357 times)
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lostman89
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« on: July 13, 2010, 02:22:04 PM »

hi yall, i just bought a 1939 ishevek 91/30 and i test fired it yesterday but find it to be shooting high to the right. can any one tell me how to do the front sight adjustment. and an other thing is my rear sight is the lowest it can go at 100 meters and i am shooting at 100 yards im shooting high. should i always aim low or is it just my MN? thank you
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nathan362
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2010, 02:26:02 PM »

Different ones shoot differently. Sometimes using the bayonet works, but will eventually ruin the blue on the end of the barrel. You can use a coffee stir stick to make the sight taller, and use a brass punch to move the sights to the right. There is a tool that regularly pops up on ebay that works well too.
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dskerns57
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2010, 02:57:49 PM »

  Mine was shooting high and to the right a well. I did the shrink tubing on the and barely moved the sight to the right, and it did what it was supposed to do. Just trim a little off at a time to get it where you want.

    Good Luck Smiley
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davec
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« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2010, 03:02:13 PM »

Drift the front sight to the right to move your group left, i.e. "chase the shot."  That will solve the windage.

For elevation, you can either trim the shrink tubing, or you can hold low.
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"...totalitarian states ... cannot give the factory worker a rifle and tell him to take it home and keep it in his bedroom. That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or laborer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there."
--George Orwell, 1940.
gtmotat
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« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2010, 10:06:26 PM »

It is really quite easy to raise the front sight and not have anything that will fall off and make the front sight wider. I found this on the web and it works.

The first thing I would do is put some P B Blaster or kroil on the front sight assembly. Let it soak over night and you will find it much easier to tap the front sight assembly off. Once you have the hood in your hands it is easy to see the base of the sight pin.

Just tap it out thru the hole in the top of the hood. Just chuck it up in a hand drill and reduce the diameter of the tapered base enough to tap it in deeper. On my 1926 Hex 91/30 it was .054 to get it on. On mine after I got everything just like I wanted it I put a small amount of green locktightn on it.

Just bare in mind that every time you change bullet weight you may find the rifle shooting high or low.  Good Luck and good shooting!  Geo. T.
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mnj
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2010, 06:24:49 AM »

Huh?
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DudleyDR
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2010, 06:53:08 AM »

Some folks just replace the original post with a nail of the proper diameter that was cut a little longer than the original post.   Then file it down to the right height as they zero.

I have several spare front sight globe assemblies that I just swap out when necessary.

Second pic is of an original F.S. post.

[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 06:55:27 AM by DudleyDR » Logged

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tacoman753
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2010, 09:15:20 AM »

when my 91/30 was shooting to the right, i tightened up my hold on the rifle and that got me in the center(not the bullseye) i was still a few inches high there, i used a 6 o'clock hold to get me on target from there
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FGD135
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« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2010, 06:35:29 PM »

when my 91/30 was shooting to the right, i tightened up my hold on the rifle and that got me in the center(not the bullseye) i was still a few inches high there, i used a 6 o'clock hold to get me on target from there

Kentucky Windage. Or, with these rifles "Smolensk Windage".
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DudleyDR
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2010, 06:42:05 PM »

Marksmanship "101" and common sense practical application of techniques.  Grin
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To paraphrase Confucious..."The pile of a thousand rifles starts with just one".
Barry
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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2010, 06:51:03 PM »

hi yall, i just bought a 1939 ishevek 91/30 and i test fired it yesterday but find it to be shooting high to the right. can any one tell me how to do the front sight adjustment. and an other thing is my rear sight is the lowest it can go at 100 meters and i am shooting at 100 yards im shooting high. should i always aim low or is it just my MN? thank you
Ditto.
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tacoman753
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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2010, 08:48:49 PM »

when my 91/30 was shooting to the right, i tightened up my hold on the rifle and that got me in the center(not the bullseye) i was still a few inches high there, i used a 6 o'clock hold to get me on target from there

Kentucky Windage. Or, with these rifles "Smolensk Windage".

haha, right on!
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Tomcat
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« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2010, 04:41:41 AM »

I would much prefer Kentucky windage over a punch and hammer!!!!
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mosinbuckeye
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« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2010, 04:45:54 AM »

I would much prefer Kentucky windage over a punch and hammer!!!!

+1.  These rifles were made as you received them with the sight as is.  Slap on a bayonet and blast away, taking into consideration the same aiming techniques the soldiers did who carried them.  If you can hit the bulls-eye without adjusting the sight, you are doing well in my book   Tongue
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davec
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2010, 06:54:35 AM »

Good advice.  That's why it is best to consult the original manual and learn how to adjust the point of aim and tweak the windage when necessary.
Four shots in 15cm no more than 5cm from the "control point" and you are good to go.  Shooting at 110 yards with the rear sight on "3" for 300 meters, the group should be 17cm high with a rifle and 19cm high with a carbine.

The US Army nailed it when they wrote, after the Korean War, that "These weapons can be considered reasonably effective infantry weapons. Fairly good shooting can be done with them at combat ranges, although their sights do not lend themselves to the finer degrees of accuracy which can be obtained with similar United States weapons. ... relatively simple to service and maintain."

The rear sight of the 91/30 satisfied two Soviet criteria: 1) robust and "soldier proof" 2) utterly simple.  The officer or NCO tells the soldat what to set it on.  If that is not possible, it is set on "3" or "4" and the aiming point adjusted accordingly.


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"...totalitarian states ... cannot give the factory worker a rifle and tell him to take it home and keep it in his bedroom. That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or laborer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there."
--George Orwell, 1940.
gtmotat
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« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2010, 09:43:27 PM »

My passing on the sight adjustment method was aimed at those of us that are going to use their rifles for more than a noisy paper punch at known ranges.

These rifles are strong , dependable and can be used for hunting and defence. Are they the best choice probably not but they are reasonably priced and there will be those that choose these rifles for these and other uses.

This is when the rifle shooting at point of aim becomes a real advantage. If your or your family's life are in the balance this is a stressful situation for sure. Given the noise and comotion all around you do you really want to remember to aim 18 inches low and a foot to the right? I don't. The same stress can be when a large buck suddenly appears in fron of you. It's hard enough to remember to hold steady and squeeze the trigger without the added hold off shot requirement.

This is my opinion but we are all alowed to think our way. I will remind you that these rifles were equiped with adjustable sights and I am sure that the scribe marks in the fron sight assemblys show where they proved to be on. The problem is I don't know if they were resighted in after referb,

Geo. T
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DudleyDR
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« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2010, 09:53:24 PM »

I adjust my sights on my "go to" weapons so that I know where they hit at a known distance with a particular load.  As gtmotat states, taking time to make a calculation or a huge allowance for POA/POI in an urgent situation is not ideal.
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To paraphrase Confucious..."The pile of a thousand rifles starts with just one".
davec
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« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2010, 05:57:35 AM »

Very true that.  My "go to" Mosin is "on" at 100 yards.

As for more dire scenarios... A Mosin-Nagant is about the last long arm I'll be grabbing... Excepting the Zombie invasion of course.  Wink Cheesy Tongue
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"...totalitarian states ... cannot give the factory worker a rifle and tell him to take it home and keep it in his bedroom. That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or laborer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there."
--George Orwell, 1940.
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